Hot answers tagged

14

Prices vary a lot, not only from country to country but also over time. Any price requirement should be considered approximate. Any price requirement that doesn't provide a precise reference (e.g. shipping and taxes can make a non-negligible difference) should be considered an order of magnitude. For example, if someone asks for storage that costs about $...


11

Each recommendation should be its own answer. This allows users to vote on the merits of each one without confusing what they are voting for. Each answer should be complete and contain details to answer the question, not just a link referring to the other answer.


10

I see nothing wrong with recommending unreleased hardware that is expected to become available in the near future ("wait a week: NVidia's new line of graphics cards will be out, and the GeForce 68040 looks like it'll be what you want"). Unannounced hardware is a different matter. If it hasn't been announced, it effectively doesn't exist, and its ...


7

If they don't answer the question in a reasonable period of time*, I'd post what they sent you as a community wiki answer, if you feel it answers your question. You should also expand on the answer at little, as there aren't a lot of details why it answers your question. There may be snippets of information behind those links that helped convince you that ...


5

In terms of conversions, we should use the currency the OP does. If they've specified a limit in US$, then we should reference the price of the item in the US. Likewise, if it's in EUR, then use the European price. Proof is unnecessary - if someone takes the advice of an answer and finds the price different, they can downvote, comment, or edit as necessary. ...


4

Everyone can choose to accept an answer or not, none of this is compulsory. However, I would suggest this rough guideline: If an answer is well-written (has enough detail), and looks like it might work, it's okay to accept it. Once you can get your hands on the hardware, or another piece of hardware mentioned in a different answer, move the checkmark as ...


3

I don't think a good answer should be "in the future, X might be available." If I'm reading this, I want an answer to: What is the hardware that will address my question, now? not in the future, not maybe, not potentially, but now. Speculative answers are not going to be helpful to that end.


3

I think that accepting an answer can be seen as a stamp of approval indicating that the OP has tested that the recommended hardware does in fact fulfill the stated requirements. If I receive an answer that sounds promising enough for me to consider buying the recommended hardware, I would upvote that answer. But until I have tested the hardware I would not ...


3

To add to the already-excellent answers here, it's important to point out that accepts still fall within the OP's purview. While we can - and perhaps should - lay down some guidelines, it's not completely up to us which answer gets accepted when. That said, some general thoughts: If you've tested the hardware suggested in an answer and it's worked for you, ...


2

I'm not sure about this solution (but like I was asked I divided my answer to two separate answers). There is many answers which recommend not one but many products in different price ranges (best in price) or in different technologies (for bigger comparission, so User which asked question can take his own decision or can have bigger knowledge about range of ...


2

Accepting answers on recommendation sites would be a bit late, as this is the flow which is usually followed: Ask recommendations about a hardware with the desired set of specs. Get answers Wait for some more answers, just in case there might be some which can be better than the existing answers. The waiting period depends completely on the OP, and his/her ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible