21

I think, they should be allowed and in fact be encouraged. We can only provide recommendations, but it is the asker (and future visitors having the same question) who has to make the final decision. This might help them make their own choices and also help them in the future when looking for similar products. The goal of SE is to provide quality answers ...


18

What strikes me about those is that most can be changed to the form of a recommendation question, without losing the question, for example: I'm picking a graphics card, and have got my choice down to X and Y. Recommend me one of them. [criteria] I'd say yes, they are on topic. The theory behind recommending hardware to people is also important to cover, ...


16

A question on Hardware Recommendations has one of two goals: A request for a product recommendation, OR A request for information that will lead to a product decision This means that Hardware Recommendations is not here to: Provide technical support of hardware Provide step-by-step instructions for Do-It-Yourself installation There is one major exception ...


10

No, I think this is a good question. It appears to be on-topic, and is asking for a hardware recommendation. To make this question even more on topic, it could be clarified to consist of what he is asking for, e.g., what types of qualities he wants. I basically want a general suggestion on how to find LCD panel of specific size, with specific (e.g. 30-...


9

This isn't a knock on ArtOfCode; this is a common fallacy that has been propagated across the network. this question is off-topic because … it would go out of date too quickly This is an inferior maxim I wish people would forget.   If the longevity of an answer was a valid reason to close a question, then half the technology questions on ...


7

One problem that I can see with these types of questions is that they may be too broad. For example, if someone asked "What should I consider when buying a graohics card?" the answer would probably be a long list of things. I do think that these questions would be useful on this site, though. My idea is that we could make collaborative community wiki ...


7

I would say no, because we all value money differently. What I would spend $50 on, you might not even spend $10. Plus it is always easier to spend other people's money. I would say these questions worded like "should I buy X for $Y" should be closed as primarily opinion-based.


6

This meta question is an XY problem. The real answer to the problem is: edit the question to focus on one meaningful question, not containing multiple questions. There can be multiple sub questions, but if you can answer one subquestion without answering the others then either: your answer isn't comprehensive enough the question should be split


6

As a counterpoint to Undo's answer, I do not think these should be on topic here. A transistor is a semiconductor device used to amplify and switch electronic signals and electrical power. - Wikipedia A transistor is among the most basic of electric components. It is much more basic than a shredder. It is a building block to hardware. A transistor, alone,...


6

Disclosure: I provided an example on the linked question I think this straddles the line of "pre-purchase" information. This question has already purchased the hardware and is really asking a configuration question: How many players can the hardware support. However, the question could easily be adjusted to something like: "I want to support X players, ...


5

This is debatable, but being so restrictive at this stage is not very encouraging. In this particular case, there is no request for a recommendation, so it can be categorized as off-topic. However, we can still ask the author to improve the question because we should avoid resignation of users from creating a new community Sometimes the question is about ...


5

In this case I recommend closing the question. This will simply be more helpful at the end of the day because it will show that lack of research is unfavorable on this site. But as discussed in my meta thread about how to handle low-quality questions, downvoting at any time whatsoever is really up to you. It'll of course show that the question isn't liked, ...


5

I've voted to close it. The initial question was answerable by simply Googling "Raspberry Pi alternatives". The updated question has added specifications that are common to almost every single one of those alternatives. The question isn't specific enough to be anything other than a list of those alternatives. The downvotes are up to you, but I don't see ...


5

You should definitely edit your question. The edit doesn't make it dramatically different in any way, and seeing as there are no answers yet, feel free to edit it for clarity as many times as you need to. Once it has an answer or two is when you should consider leaving it as it is and instead commenting on the answer to ask for more specificity. This is so ...


5

asks for general feedback of a build This sounds too broad. I think your description, combined with the last paragraph of the question being discussed, definitely makes the question to broad. Are there any other improvements I could take, or is what I have good enough for my current use, and changing anything would be a waste of money? "Any other ...


5

Recommended, not required. It's not absolutely essential to have the location in a question - unlike the specific requirements that we do mandate, location doesn't influence what product fits the poster's specification. For that reason, we shouldn't be requiring a location. However, there are going to be plenty of cases where a location helps - in ...


4

This question feels off topic to me. There is a lot of information in the question that isn't relevant, including: This is for a piece of fiction This is for a piece of hardware that is 10 years old The author's limited knowledge of hardware from 10 years ago "Function" being proposed by this fictional hardware The heart of the question boils down to: "[W]...


4

I'd definitely answer that first question. It's a recommendation and completely on topic here. That second one is going to be very opinion based. I may or may not mention it in my answer for that reason. If you are going to answer the question that is a recommendation, then yes, provide an answer. If you are going to answer the opinion question, I'd say ...


4

These should be on-topic. Recommendations, while they can work in the SE model, are prone to going without answers. Go check out SR. It's a good thing if we can include plenty of other stuff in our scope as well; this should be one of those things. It's arguably more useful long-term advice than a simple recommendation, could benefit a lot of people, and ...


3

Thoughts: good idea. The other major advantage of them that I can see is they provide explanation and backdrop to straight recommendation questions. If you answer a recommendation, and there's a related "what should I consider?" question, you can link to it and say "look, I've considered these things for you, and this result matches all of your criteria and ...


3

They should be. It makes perfect sense to have a site about picking the right computing hardware for a task. There's no need to impose a particular format on questions. We do need quality controls — I think we'll end up with guidelines similar to the ones on Software Recommendations — but they apply to teach-me-to-fish questions as much as to feed-me-a-fish ...


3

I interpreted that question as, "Recommend hardware. And, BTW, here's something I found during my research that might be suitable." Which presumably is the kind of "show your work so far" question we want to encourage. Even if it were literally, "Does x meet this need?" the first answer to that example shows that a very helpful answer can be provided even ...


3

I agree with belford's answer and would further assert that these questions are on-topic. It's just a matter of phrasing. In the given example, what if the question had been phrased: I want to improve my sound fidelity. Here is my current equipment: .... Note that I have no pre-amp. Is there anything I can do in the amplification group to notably ...


3

I assume you're talking about your answer here (2k). If a question asks two (tightly related) questions, then you don't necessarily need to answer both to qualify for an answer. You do need to answer the primary question, though. On Hardware Recommendations, I'm going to say that the primary question - unless it's very obviously not - is the one that asks ...


3

I believe these should be on topic here. We're likely to be able to answer them, and quality rules could be the same. I'd say that if it otherwise contains enough information, we should let it stay. I don't see a reason to restrict ourselves to 'consumery' requests only - we can do these, and we can do them well. Let's take them.


3

I think questions specifically about VMs are off topic. VMs are nothing more than software, and software is obviously off topic here. The exception, if you can even call it that, is asking about what hardware a VM will use or run off of. You need a computer of some kind to run a VM, so asking about that computer's components is definitely on topic. On ...


3

Note: This post reflects the current consensus on the subject of general-advice questions. It was chosen based on the arguments it presents and some additional discussion had in chat. I vote to restrict this kind of question. It has great intentions, and this question specifically is honestly very interesting, but these simply don't fulfill what people ...


3

This may not be the most coherent line of thought, but I wanted to say something before this is officially decided. I want to allow general advice questions, but I think the problem is that many of them end up being sub-par, weak, or closable for other reasons. I think we could also take some more time to see if we get some really good ones, if needed. In ...


3

Let's address those contradictions first. The comment states general advice goes out of date quickly and implies that specific recommendations do not, or at least implies that general advice is unwanted because it goes out of date quickly. However, the exact opposite is the case: Specific recommendations by their very nature go out of date quickly, ...


3

The latter meta question that you referred to is our current canonical definition of scope. Undo's answer provides a very nicely quotable definition: Hardware is any primarily electronic item that can perform more than one task, designed to interface with, connect to, or be, a primary computing platform in day-to-day operation. A primary computing platform ...


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